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Anne Thomas Manes

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Top Stories by Anne Thomas Manes

When discussing Web services, most people tend to focus on the core Web services framework (the standards and protocols) and the applications that you can build with the framework. Although I have no trouble waxing profusely on these topics, I get even more jazzed when I start to think about infrastructure-level Web services. (I know. I need to get a life.) Infrastructure-level Web services are Web services that implement part of the distributed computing infrastructure. They help other Web services communicate. In particular, these services make the Web services framework more robust. They provide such functionality as: Security and provisioning Performance management Operational management Metering, billing, and payments Routing and orchestration Advertisement and discovery Caching and queuing State management and persistence John Hagel and John Seely Brown refer t... (more)

Keynote Panel: Summit on Web Services Standards

Anne Thomas Manes and a panel of industry experts will talk about the new standardization process, and discuss the effectiveness of this process in terms of faster times to market. Join in the discussion with the Chair of the WS-I basic working Group and representatives from industry leading corporations, and gain insights into how this process will impact your technology strategy. Panelists: Chris Ferris (IBM, Chair, WS-I Basic Profile Working Group) Andrew Layman (Senior Program Manager, Microsoft) David Orchard (technical director in BEA Systems' CTO Office, focusing on Web serv... (more)

The State of Standards

There is an old saying among standards wonks: "The most wonderful thing about standards is that there are so many of them." And this truism is more applicable today than ever before. There are so many WS-* specifications, I've started referring to them as WS-Vertigo. But there is a reason that there are so many of them. The Web Services Framework (WSF) relies on a composable architecture. One of the primary tenets of the WSF is to keep things as simple as possible. Therefore, if an application doesn't require security, reliability, or transactions, you shouldn't clutter up the i... (more)

Registering a Web Service in UDDI

UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery and Integration) is a registry for Web services. It provides a mechanism to advertise and discover Web services. Although you don't need to use UDDI to implement a Web services solution, you'll find that a UDDI registry greatly simplifies the management and administration of your services, particularly once they have reached a certain critical mass. Once you've developed more than a few services, and once you start giving access to those services to more than a few controlled individuals, management starts to get more challenging. Potential... (more)

Book Excerpt: When to Use Web Services

There are many compelling reasons to use Web services. It seems as if everyone is at least playing with Web services. Almost every software vendor is building support for Web services into its platforms, languages, and tools. Web services enable any-to-any integration, supporting any programming language, any runtime platform, and any network transport. Technologies such as SOAP and WSDL are simpler to use than traditional integration middleware technologies, and they offer much more flexibility. When combined with domain-specific industry standards, Web services enable unprecede... (more)